Sequoia National Park

There are these big trees out there called Sequoias. They call them Giants, and people like hugging them for photos; maybe being one with a very big tree makes one feel bigger. It’s very likely that the biggest trees receive quite many more hugs than average humans. I wonder, who was the first to suggest the trend ? What could be the earliest photos capturing tree-hugs. We thought we’ll check those trees out, and packed our stuff to visit a place supposedly filled with them – Sequoia National Park.

Scott and I departed Yosemite valley neighborhood – Yosemite Bugs (https://www.yosemitebug.com/) backpackers that I spent a super peaceful week in. Definitely recommend this place for stay/food. Found a small family of travelers there too, and celebrated having a bed to sleep in and shower to enjoy. Scott in the meantime had an epic two-day drive from Squamish, Canada to Yosemite, and one should definitely admire this ability to steer a car for so long.

We drove south, and the landscape became more desert-like, trees more scarce. As we entered the road leading towards the National Park, we wondered where those crazy giant trees might be hiding.

Even though the giants were hiding, tons of citrus fruits – oranges, lemons, tangerines were all around the road. We could not not stop and take some … Or I guess I couldn’t not try to pick an orange straight of a tree for an afternoon snack. So we quickly stopped, I jumped out of the car and grabbed a few better looking fruit, and we rushed off again. All was covered with a thick layer of pesticides though ..! So I ended up being totally covered in thick white poisonous powder – not that idyllic at all !

As we paid our National Park fee – 20USD for a week, and entered the Sequoia National park, we started driving up a windy road up towards the forests. The sun was already setting, and evening colors filled the valley and decorated its skies.

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Golden Sequoia sunset

There were creeks and trees, and distant peaks and pretty clouds. I however wanted to see some Giants before the dark-fall, and Scott and I kept on driving. And there we are ! I think I might be seeing some super big trees already!

Massive proud sequoias looming in the darkness, cold and thick snow cover ! Yep, we indeed went from picking oranges off side of the road to making tracks in snow in less than 50 miles. It looked very  special, mysterious and powerful. For me, forests in the dark appear frighting, and yet somewhat comforting and cozy. As we drove up further uphill and into the darkness, the snow cover got thicker and the air colder. Soon we reached Wuksachi Lodge – another “fancy” hotel in the middle of the wilderness, with a name I cannot pronounce properly. We quickly warmed up, used some WiFi, and drove back the hill to a campsite below snow level – Buckeye Flat campsite.

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Scott made friends at the Wuksachi lodge , but I’m pretty sure the brown bear was in it just for the Skittles

The campsite was almost empty, and completely beautiful, with drive-in campsites, tables, fresh water, cozy lawns and pretty trees. Excellent nights sleep. In the morning we got greeted by the local bird population that courageously was stealing chunks of cheese and bread.

Next morning we drove up back to the park to visit some of those giants in daylight. Driving up we saw a car stop, holding up 4 cars behind, on a narrow road. As we waited, and cursed about the “silly tourists”, we finally go to see the view everyone was stopping for – a beautiful black bear peacefully rustling through spacious light forest. We made our “tourists-on-the-road-stop” and I snapped a few quick photos.

Soon enough we reached the forests with the Sequoia trees. Photos speak for themselves here; it was great. We saw some deer and a quite a few frozen tourists. I also managed to squeeze in a quick road run through frozen forests – lovely.

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Majestic Deer Creature I
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Majestic Deer Creature II
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Tourists excited about the Majestic Deer creature
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More Giant trees
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Scott climbing the roots of a fallen Sequoia trees
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Me again and yet another Sequoia tree
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That’s what I do wherever I go

We spent another night in the park, and in the morning departed towards Bishop – for some climbing, and hopefully – more warmth.

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Breakfast at our campsite: eggs, polenta and peanut butter
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